Health and Social Services

This is a pathway that includes a large and diverse group of careers. Human services involves careers that help people and families meet their needs, including education, social services, and mental health needs.

The health and medicine career pathway includes careers that promote health, wellness, and diagnosis as well as treat injuries and diseases. Some of the careers involve working directly with people while others involve research into diseases or collecting and formatting data and information. Work locations are varied and may be in hospitals, medical or dental offices or laboratories, cruise ships, medivac units, sports arenas, space centers, or within the community.

 

Advanced Degrees4 Year DegreesCommunity CollegesHigh School Diplomas,
Vocational/Technical Training, On the Job Training, Career
Suggested Courses:
4 Years Honors / AP English
4 Years of Honors / AP Math
4 Years Honors / AP Lab Science (biology, chemistry, physics, elective)
4 Years Honors /AP Social Studies
2-3 Years of one Foreign Language

Students may also wish to consider concurrent enrollment at local colleges.
Suggested Courses:
4 Years English
4 Years Math
3-4 Years Lab Science (biology, chemistry or physics, elective)
4 Years Social Studies
2-3 Years of one Foreign Language

Students may wish to consider honors courses as well

Students may also wish to consider concurrent enrollment at local colleges.
Suggested Courses:
4 Years English
4 Years Math
3-4 Science
3-4 Social Studies
2-3 Years of one Foreign Language

Students may also wish to consider concurrent enrollment at local colleges.
Suggested Courses:
4 Years English
3 Years Math
3 Years Science
3 Years Social Studies
English 12 Non-fiction
AP Psychology
AP Calculus
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Environmental Science
AP Physics C
Honors Anatomy & Physiology
Genetics
Biotechnology
Forensic Organic Chemistry
PLTW - Biomedical Sciences
PLTW- Engineering
Introduction to Kinesiology
Introduction to Epidemiology
Personal Fitness Training
Athletic Health and Fitness (BAVTS)
Medical Arts Academy (BAVTS)
English 12- Non-fiction
Skepticism & Logic
Sociology
Psychology
Calculus
Genetics
Biotechnology
Forensic Organic Chemistry
Anatomy & Physiology
PLTW - Biomedical Sciences
PLTW- Engineering
Sports Nutrition
Introduction to Kinesiology
Introduction to Epidemiology
Personal Fitness Training
Athletic Health and Fitness (BAVTS)
Medical Arts Academy (BAVTS)
Sociology
Psychology
Skepticism & Logic
Human Forensics
Human Growth & Development
Genetics
Biotechnology
Anatomy & Physiology
PLTW - Biomedical Sciences
PLTW- Engineering
Parenting & Child Development
Exploring Childhood/ Preschool Lab
Cooking Classes
Personal Fitness Training
Athletic Health and Fitness (BAVTS)
Medical Arts Academy (BAVTS)
Health Careers (BAVTS)
Sociology
Psychology
Skepticism & Logic (LHS)
Human Forensics
Human Growth & Development (LHS)
PLTW - Biomedical Sciences
Cooking Classes
Personal Fitness Training
Athletic Health and Fitness (BAVTS)
Health Careers (BAVTS)

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

AP BIOLOGY (SC5050) 1.5 credits (27 weeks)                   

Prerequisites:  See Honors Program Requirements; successful completion of Honors Biology is highly recommended; Successful completion of Honors Chemistry is highly recommended

The Advanced Placement Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Students are challenged with new ideas and greater detail in the eight major themes of biology: evolution, energy transfer, continuity and change, relationship of structure and function, regulation, interdependence in nature, science as process, and science, technology, and society. Major units include biochemistry, cellular biology, energy, genetics, molecular genetics, evolution, anatomy and physiology, plant and animal diversity, and ecology. Laboratory skills, including dissection, are developed and reinforced through the AP labs. Notes: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

AP CHEMISTRY (SC5040) 1.5 credits (27 weeks)

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Honors Chemistry is highly recommended

The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course. Students will complete experiments and problems designed to prepare them for taking standardized chemistry tests such as the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam and SAT II Chemistry exam. Basic concepts of nomenclature, mole relationships and stoichiometry are reviewed to help provide background for lab experiments performed. In depth studies include: analytical chemistry techniques, solutions, equilibria, thermochemistry, kinetics, electrochemistry, materials science, organic chemistry and biochemistry. Notes: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (SC5060)1.5 credits (27 weeks)

Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry is highly recommended

The goal of the AP Environmental Science Course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.  This course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, the introductory college course in Environmental Science.  Students are encouraged to take the AP Environmental Science test offered by Collegeboard in the spring. Note: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (SC9009) 1.0 credit

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Biology

The goal of the Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Students will also identify and analyze environmental issues both natural and human-made. The students will be exposed to a variety of environmental testing techniques to help understand the strategies involved in solving environmental problems. Topics may include: ecology, water, soils, pollution, and populations.

HONORS HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (SC9000) 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: See Honors Program Requirements and successful completion of biology and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry

Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology is designed for the highly motivated college preparatory student who may be planning further study in the natural sciences or in the allied health fields or simply would like to understand their own bodies better.  This course will emphasize, in detail, metabolism, histology, support, movement, communication, control, and integration.  Instructional methods include but are not limited to: lecture and discussion, report writing, computer-aided instruction, handling human skeletons, and multiple in-depth dissections. Notes: The grade for this course is weighted. This course is strongly recommended for those students who may consider Advanced Placement courses.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (SC9002)1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a course designed for the college preparatory student who has successfully completed Biology and Chemistry and who is interested in careers in the allied health fields, or any student that has a strong interest in the structure and function of the human body.  This course will cover: anatomical and physiological terminology, basic biochemistry, cytology, histology, the skeletal system, the muscular system, and the nervous system.  Instructional methods include but are not limited to: lecture and discussion, computer-aided instruction, handling human skeletons, and multiple in-depth dissections.

HUMAN FORENSICS (SC9079) 0.5 credit

As a 9 week course, Human Forensics will provide an introduction to criminalistics and forensics, including such topics as: fingerprints; impressions (footprints, bite marks, tool marks, tire marks, and firearms), document analysis, analysis of human (including skeletal) remains, and evidence from blood and other bodily fluids. The course includes case studies and examination of reproduced evidence from actual crimes as well as laboratory analysis of evidence gathered at simulated crime scenes.

GENETICS (SC9089) 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

This course will expand upon what is learned about genetics in Honors Biology or Biology. Students will explore the principles of heredity at an advanced level using multiple model organisms. Human inheritance will be explored focusing on human behavior and disorders. Emphasis will be placed on statistical analysis of data in laboratory experiments, as well as reading scientific literature. At least one formal lab report is required. This course can be taken along with the Biotechnology elective for a full semester course.

BIOTECHNOLOGY (SC9099) 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

This course will focus on answering three questions: How does our understanding of human heredity and genetics allow us to investigate and manipulate cellular function?  How can we use these techniques to impact and advance human society?  How can the scientific community ethically monitor its use of this technology? Students will enhance their understanding of inheritance and gene expression as they expand upon the foundational knowledge learned in the introductory biology course. The majority of class time will be spent in the laboratory setting, where students will be actively engaged in learning various biotech techniques such as DNA extraction, microbial culturing, quantitative protein analysis, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, and gel electrophoresis. A written component of this course requires students to write detailed lab report summaries, as well as summarize and evaluate at least one scientific journal article. This course can be taken along with the Genetics elective for a full semester course.

HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (SC9069) 0.5 credit

Offered at Liberty High School

This course focuses on the basic structure and function of the human reproductive system.  The physiology of gametogenesis, fertilization, contraception, gestation, parturition, lactation, and reproductive behavior will be discussed. Fetal development and the process of delivery will be studied in relation to pregnancy and birth.

FORENSIC ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (SC9109) 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry

Forensic Organic Chemistry includes such topics such as organic structures and simple nomenclature, properties of organic chemicals; investigation of arson and bomb evidence; and analysis of physical evidence such as ink, paint, fibers, and lipstick; and drug and toxicology screens. The course will include case studies and examination of reproduced evidence from actual crimes as well as laboratory analysis of evidence gathered at simulated crime scenes. Note: This course does not take the place of regular chemistry.

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

AP PSYCHOLOGY (SS5050) 1.0 credit

AP Psychology introduces the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology.  Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

PSYCHOLOGY (SS9149)0.5 credit                    

This course involves a survey of selected themes in psychology. It is an academic course with a variety of assessments as well as homework. The class will familiarize students with general psychological terms and ideas in preparation for college or work force expectations. The following topics will be covered: introduction to psychology, altered states of consciousness, infancy and adulthood, adolescence, adulthood, old age, stress and health, abnormal behavior, and therapy and change.

SOCIOLOGY (SS9139) 0.5 credit

This course will familiarize students with general sociological terms and ideas in preparation for college or work force expectations. The primary objective of this course is to study the process of human interaction and the social dynamics present in this behavior. The following topics will be covered: introduction to sociology, the socialization process, sex and gender, crime, the American family, gerontology, and sociology-present and future. This course involves an in depth investigation of a variety of subfields of sociology. This investigation will be undertaken in one or more of several types of project-based activities chosen jointly by the instructor and student. The course will also include in-depth seminar discussions of sociology topics.

FINE and PRACTICAL ARTS DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND PARENTING (FC9039) 1.0 credit

A course designed to introduce students to child development and childcare concepts and investigates the rewards and responsibilities of parenting. Human development from conception to age three is discussed. Course content focuses on understanding the physical, emotional, and intellectual development with practical application to ensure that knowledge is put to good use. Students also learn how parents and other caregivers can nurture, encourage, and stimulate children’s growth in all areas of development.

EXPLORING CHILDHOOD / PRESCHOOL LAB (FC9049) 1.0 credit

If you enjoy working with children or want to pursue a career in Early Childhood Education, this is the course for you. This program provides an opportunity to study the development of children three through five years old. The student will participate in observing, interacting, planning activities and teaching in a lab preschool program. Administration reserves the right to deny enrollment due to behavioral issues. Note: This course can be taken multiple times for advanced study of the subject.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY (HF9089)0.5 credit

This course explores specific health-related issues relevant to students through the science of epidemiology, the study of how and why diseases are distributed in a given population. This course will prepare students to make personal and collective evidence-based decisions pertaining to public health.

INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY (HF9079) 0.5 credit

This course is designed for those students who are interested in pursuing a career in the field of kinesiology.  The philosophy, history and scientific foundations of kinesiology, exercise science, health/wellness, fitness and sport will be covered.  Students will have the opportunity to explore professional career opportunities in teaching, coaching, athletic training, sport management, fitness leadership, sport media and health/wellness. The challenges, future of kinesiology, sport and health/wellness are also addressed.

SPORTS NUTRITION (HF9069) 0.5 credit

Sports Nutrition is a class that enables students to examine the relationship between physical activity, proper nutrition, sports performance and overall wellness. Students will learn what foods are needed for healthy lifestyles and peak performance. This course strengthens health promotion and disease prevention through increased knowledge of nutrition and physical activity. This course will also take an in-depth look at the role of dietary supplements in high school athletics. Sports Nutrition is a great class for students interested in pursuing a career in the fitness field or are currently involved in an athletic program.

LIFEGUARD TRAINING AND ADVENTURE (HF9139)0.5 credit

Students will complete the American Red Cross Lifeguard course. Swimming ability equal to American Red Cross Lifeguard pre-course skills checklist. Students must be 15 years of age .A swimming ability equal to level 4 of the Red Cross swim program is required, which includes swimming for distances with rhythmic breathing, treading water, deep water submersion.

PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINING (HF9149) 0.5 credit

A hybrid course designed specifically for students who have an interest in learning about becoming a personal fitness trainer. Students will learn about anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, fitness testing and health assessment, nutrition, exercise prescription, equipment usage, and legal/safety issues. Interested seniors will be provided with the option of sitting for a National Personal Fitness Trainer Certification exam* upon successful completion of the course. Note: Students must be 18 years of age to take the National Personal Fitness Trainer Certification exam.

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

PUBLIC SPEAKING (EN9049) 0.5 credit

Public Speaking helps students prepare for various speaking situations. Students are guided toward the creative development of speaking forms: process, persuasive, and informational. Additional skills emphasized include planning, preparing, and presenting a speech, the incorporation of technology, and critical evaluation.

EFFECTIVE PRESENTATION SKILLS FOR 21ST CENTURY CAREERS (EN9149) 0.5 credit

This course will provide students with the necessary skills and supports for career-based public speaking and presentations, including methods of gathering and presenting information for a variety of audiences. Special emphasis will be placed on providing support for students conducting field studies and capstone projects in all subject areas and career pathways.

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION & PUBLIC RELATIONS (EN9109) 0.5 credit

Introduction to Communication and Public Relations explores the fundamentals of various applications of persuasive and public relations techniques to forms of written and oral communications. Some forms covered will be press releases, media kits, sales and promotional pieces, newsletters and related formats. Students will apply problem-solving skills and public relations principles to real-world projects and assignments. In addition, students will learn how to promote a product, brand, or event through effective communication campaigns.

PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIONS (EN9119) 0.5 credit

In this course, students will explore the communications/media field by examining the various roles and responsibilities of the media as well as career options. Students will study key topics such as videography, animation/graphics, editing, reporting and writing, storyboarding, verbal communication, social media, and digital strategies.