Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

Engineers and technicians design and build things. They are critical in all kinds of manufacturing, especially at the earliest stages when products and processes are being created and refined.

A career in science is exciting, challenging, and ever-changing. Learners who pursue one of these career fields will be involved in planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical services including laboratory and testing services, and research and development services.

The agriculture pathway prepares learners for careers in the planning, implementation, production, management, processing, and/or marketing of agricultural commodities and services.

 

Advanced Degrees4 Year DegreesCommunity CollegesHigh School Diplomas,
Vocational/Technical Training, On the Job Training, Career
Suggested Courses:
4 Years Honors / AP English
4 Years of Honors / AP Math
4 Years Honors / AP Lab Science (biology, chemistry, physics, elective)
4 Years Honors /AP Social Studies
2-3 Years of one Foreign Language

Students may also wish to consider concurrent enrollment at local colleges.
Suggested Courses:
4 Years English
4 Years Math
3-4 Years Lab Science (biology, chemistry or physics, elective)
4 Years Social Studies
2-3 Years of one Foreign Language

Students may wish to consider honors courses as well

Students may also wish to consider concurrent enrollment at local colleges.
Suggested Courses:
4 Years English
4 Years Math
3-4 Science
3-4 Social Studies
2-3 Years of one Foreign Language

Students may also wish to consider concurrent enrollment at local colleges.
Suggested Courses:
4 Years English
3 Years Math
3 Years Science
3 Years Social Studies
English 12 Non-fiction
AP Calculus
AP Statistics
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Environmental Science
AP Physics C
Genetics
Biotechnology
Forensic Organic Chemistry
Materials Science
PLTW- Biomedical Sciences
PLTW - Engineering
AP Computer Science Principles
Computer Programming
Academy for Applied Engineering (BAVTS)
English 12 Non-fiction
Calculus
Genetics
Biotechnology
Forensic Organic Chemistry
Meteorology (FHS)
Environmental Science
PLTW - Biomedical Sciences
PLTW- Engineering
Computer Programming
Academy for Applied Engineering (BAVTS)
Astronomy
Geology
Zoology
Meteorology
Environmental Science
Biotechnology
Genetics
Human Forensics
Astronomy
PLTW - Engineering
PLTW- Biomedical Sciences
Computer Programming
Creating Apps for Phones, Pads, & Other Devices
Woodcraft
Stage Craft
PLTW - Engineering
Woodcraft
Cabinet Making (BAVTS)
Carpentry (BAVTS)
Electrical Construction (BAVTS)
HVAC (BAVTS)
Masonry (BAVTS)
Plumbing (BAVTS)
Electronic Engineering & Manufacturing (BAVTS)
Auto Collision & Repair (BAVTS)
Welding (BAVTS)

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

AP BIOLOGY (SC5050) 1.5 credits (27 weeks)                   

Prerequisites:  See Honors Program Requirements; successful completion of Honors Biology is highly recommended; Successful completion of Honors Chemistry is highly recommended

The Advanced Placement Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Students are challenged with new ideas and greater detail in the eight major themes of biology: evolution, energy transfer, continuity and change, relationship of structure and function, regulation, interdependence in nature, science as process, and science, technology, and society. Major units include biochemistry, cellular biology, energy, genetics, molecular genetics, evolution, anatomy and physiology, plant and animal diversity, and ecology. Laboratory skills, including dissection, are developed and reinforced through the AP labs. Notes: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

AP CHEMISTRY (SC5040) 1.5 credits (27 weeks)

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Honors Chemistry is highly recommended

The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course. Students will complete experiments and problems designed to prepare them for taking standardized chemistry tests such as the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam and SAT II Chemistry exam. Basic concepts of nomenclature, mole relationships and stoichiometry are reviewed to help provide background for lab experiments performed. In depth studies include: analytical chemistry techniques, solutions, equilibria, thermochemistry, kinetics, electrochemistry, materials science, organic chemistry and biochemistry. Notes: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

AP PHYSICS C: ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM (SC5030) 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: See Honors Program Requirements; Successful completion of AP Physics 1; Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Precalculus; Offered at Liberty High School

AP Physics C- Electricity & Magnetism is a calculus-based course equivalent to the pre-engineering introductory Physics course for university students.  This course is designed in accordance with the College Board guidelines.  The emphasis of this course is on the understanding of the fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism using analytical problem solving skills and engaging students in laboratory work.  Differential and Integral Calculus is used throughout the course.  Each student will keep a laboratory notebook or save all lab reports in a portfolio. Note: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

AP PHYSICS C: MECHANICS (SC5020) 1.5 credits (27 weeks)

Prerequisites: See Honors Program Requirements; Successful completion of AP Physics 1; Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Precalculus; Offered at Freedom High School

AP Physics C – Mechanics will improve student’s skills by stressing the use of fundamental modeling in classical mechanics, increasing their analytical skills, and using hands-on laboratory investigations.  Differential and Integral calculus is used throughout the course.  Students will be required to keep a detailed lab book. Each student will be required to keep a detailed notebook. Note: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (SC5060) 1.5 credits (27 weeks)

Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry is highly recommended

The goal of the AP Environmental Science Course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.  This course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, the introductory college course in Environmental Science.  Students are encouraged to take the AP Environmental Science test offered by Collegeboard in the spring. Note: The grade for this course is weighted. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP College Board exam in May.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (SC9009) 1.0 credit

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Biology

The goal of the Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Students will also identify and analyze environmental issues both natural and human-made. The students will be exposed to a variety of environmental testing techniques to help understand the strategies involved in solving environmental problems. Topics may include: ecology, water, soils, pollution, and populations.

PENNSYLVANIA WILDLIFE CSI (SC9039) Offered at Liberty High School 1.0 credit

Pennsylvania Wildlife CSI is a course for third-year science students and will provide a detailed study of the ecology of Pennsylvania including wildlife, aquatics, and forestry.  The emphasis will then be on using this information to solve a variety of crimes based on biological clues taken from the scene. Forensic skills utilized will be microscopy fiber analysis, trace evidence study, forensic entomology, forensic botany, fingerprint identification, and other evidence. Most of the work will be done on simulated crime scenes based on real-life cases.

HONORS HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (SC9000) 1.0 credit

Prerequisites: See Honors Program Requirements and successful completion of biology and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry

Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology is designed for the highly motivated college preparatory student who may be planning further study in the natural sciences or in the allied health fields or simply would like to understand their own bodies better.  This course will emphasize, in detail, metabolism, histology, support, movement, communication, control, and integration.  Instructional methods include but are not limited to: lecture and discussion, report writing, computer-aided instruction, handling human skeletons, and multiple in-depth dissections. Notes: The grade for this course is weighted. This course is strongly recommended for those students who may consider Advanced Placement courses.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (SC9002) 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a course designed for the college preparatory student who has successfully completed Biology and Chemistry and who is interested in careers in the allied health fields, or any student that has a strong interest in the structure and function of the human body.  This course will cover: anatomical and physiological terminology, basic biochemistry, cytology, histology, the skeletal system, the muscular system, and the nervous system.  Instructional methods include but are not limited to: lecture and discussion, computer-aided instruction, handling human skeletons, and multiple in-depth dissections.

EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE (SC9119) 1.0 credit

Earth and Space Science will provide a student with a brief overview of the primary disciplines comprising Earth and Space Science. Approximately six weeks will be spent on each of the following areas: oceanography, geology, cartography, and meteorology. It will also emphasize student awareness of the relationships between the various disciplines of Earth and Space Science.

 ASTRONOMY 1 (SC9129) 0.5 credit

Astronomy 1 is a non-mathematical course in which the student will study the solar system, the earth, and the earth’s immediate space environment.  The history of astronomy, the space race, eclipses, the planets, physical laws governing the universe, the measurement of time, and theories regarding the origin of the solar system and universe will be considered.

ASTRONOMY 2 (SC9139) Offered at Freedom High School 0.5 credit

Astronomy 2 is a course intended to continue the study of Astronomy using Starry Night Software and the Planetarium. This course is intended to introduce the student to other topics in astronomy that include the solar system and moons and planets, asteroids, Comets and meteors, near earth objects, galaxies and our milky way galaxy, black holes, Creation of the universe, and other advanced topics in astronomy.

METEOROLOGY (SC9149)Offered at Freedom High School 0.5 credit

This course will provide students with an overview of meteorology. The students will investigate the forces that determine weather patterns both locally and globally. Topics will include the formation, movement, and interactions of air masses. Severe weather disturbances such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes will also be discussed. The class will wrap up with a cumulative weather map forecasting project designed to incorporate much of the course content.

GEOLOGY (SC9159) 0.5 credit

Geology is the study of the materials of which the earth is composed and the geologic processes taking place within the earth and on its surface. The third-year student will study topics including minerals, weathering, erosion, and plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and mass wasting.

ZOOLOGY (SC9059) 0.5 credit

This course explores zoology and issues dealing with ecology, evolution, comparative anatomy and biotechnology. This course is designed for college prep students who have completed Biology and are self-motivated and interested in broadening their knowledge of the biological sciences. Students will have the opportunity to enhance laboratory and research skills in groups and independent explorations.

HUMAN FORENSICS (SC9079) 0.5 credit

As a 9 week course, Human Forensics will provide an introduction to criminalistics and forensics, including such topics as: fingerprints; impressions (footprints, bite marks, tool marks, tire marks, and firearms), document analysis, analysis of human (including skeletal) remains, and evidence from blood and other bodily fluids. The course includes case studies and examination of reproduced evidence from actual crimes as well as laboratory analysis of evidence gathered at simulated crime scenes.

GENETICS (SC9089) 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

This course will expand upon what is learned about genetics in Honors Biology or Biology. Students will explore the principles of heredity at an advanced level using multiple model organisms. Human inheritance will be explored focusing on human behavior and disorders. Emphasis will be placed on statistical analysis of data in laboratory experiments, as well as reading scientific literature. At least one formal lab report is required. This course can be taken along with the Biotechnology elective for a full semester course.

BIOTECHNOLOGY  (SC9099) 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

This course will focus on answering three questions: How does our understanding of human heredity and genetics allow us to investigate and manipulate cellular function?  How can we use these techniques to impact and advance human society?  How can the scientific community ethically monitor its use of this technology? Students will enhance their understanding of inheritance and gene expression as they expand upon the foundational knowledge learned in the introductory biology course. The majority of class time will be spent in the laboratory setting, where students will be actively engaged in learning various biotech techniques such as DNA extraction, microbial culturing, quantitative protein analysis, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, and gel electrophoresis. A written component of this course requires students to write detailed lab report summaries, as well as summarize and evaluate at least one scientific journal article. This course can be taken along with the Genetics elective for a full semester course.

HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (SC9069) 0.5 credit

Offered at Liberty High School

This course focuses on the basic structure and function of the human reproductive system.  The physiology of gametogenesis, fertilization, contraception, gestation, parturition, lactation, and reproductive behavior will be discussed. Fetal development and the process of delivery will be studied in relation to pregnancy and birth.

FORENSIC ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (SC9109) 0.5 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry

Forensic Organic Chemistry includes such topics such as organic structures and simple nomenclature, properties of organic chemicals; investigation of arson and bomb evidence; and analysis of physical evidence such as ink, paint, fibers, and lipstick; and drug and toxicology screens. The course will include case studies and examination of reproduced evidence from actual crimes as well as laboratory analysis of evidence gathered at simulated crime scenes. Note: This course does not take the place of regular chemistry.

MATERIAL SCIENCE: METALS AND SOLIDS (SC91890.5 credit

Materials Science is the study of “stuff.” It involves designing, choosing, and using two major classes of materials—metals and solids. The course is lab and project-based with intensive hands-on experiences. Investigations include the growth of crystals, corrosion, making alloys, rolling a coin, drawing a wire, tin-lead soldering, science of chocolate, and more. This course is perfect for the student who is interested in an engineering and STEM career pathway. Evaluation is based on journaling, homework, projects, lab reports, lab practicals, and quizzes.

MATERIAL SCIENCE: CERAMICS (SC9199) 0.5 credit

Materials Science is the study of “stuff.” It involves designing, choosing, and using three major classes of materials—ceramics, polymers, and composites. The course is lab and project-based with intensive hands-on experiences. Investigations include stained glass, Raku pottery, polymer identification, making Nylon and Latex, concrete, and more. This course is perfect for the student who is interested in an engineering and STEM career pathway. Evaluation is based on journaling, homework, projects, lab reports, lab practicals, and quizzes.

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

ACCOUNTING  (BU9019) 1.0 credit

This introductory course is designed to help students develop the basic skills necessary for double-entry accounting as well as obtain a basic understanding of a business’s financial operation.  The course covers the entire accounting cycle for a service business organized as a proprietorship and a merchandising partnership.  Students will learn to use the general ledger, journals and subsidiary ledgers. Note: This course can be taken multiple times for advanced study of the subject.

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS (BU9009) 1.0 credit

Students will learn basic business terminology and functions used in business. Topics include an overview of various aspects of world economies and the economic interdependence of countries. Included are a study of banking systems and the relationships of business to government, labor, and international trade. Preparation and exploration are included for further education as college business majors and /or for post-high school careers in the business community. Students experience many facets of the world of work through the use of guest speakers, field trips and simulations. 

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (TE9159) 0.5 credit

This course is designed to introduce students to computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Topics include human-computer interaction, problem-solving, web design, programming, and data analysis.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 1 (TE9009) 1.0 credit

The Computer Programming course is designed to introduce the concepts of computer programming using a studio of current programming languages.  Students will learn how to analyze tasks and design algorithms to solve mathematical and real-world business-related problems.  Students learn the process of coding, debugging and executing program files.  Visual Basic.net, C++ and Java are taught throughout the course.  Students will code programs throughout the course and a final project will be designed at the end of the course. Note: Strong math skills and a sincere interest in computer programming are recommended.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 2 (TE9019) 1.0 credit

In the first half of this course, students will continue to develop their computer programming skills using the structured design of Java, C++, or Visual Basic.  Fostering an understanding of program flow will be emphasized.  The second half of this course will be an independent study as students will be required to design a final project utilizing the advanced programming techniques taught in class.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES (TE5010) 1.0 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1

The AP Computer Science Principles course is equivalent to a first-semester introductory college course where students develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society and the world.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (TE5000) 1.0 credit

AP Computer Science students will learn to design, use and implement programming tools to solve complex problems relevant to today’s society including art, media, and engineering through hands-on experience and examples.  Core aspects of computer science will be used to create programming solutions that are understandable, adaptable, and reusable using development and analysis of algorithms, fundamental data structures and the use of logic and formal methods.  The course and exam are designed to prepare students to continue their study of computing and STEM-related fields.  The course emphasizes object-oriented and imperative problem-solving in addition to the ethical and social aspects and implications of computing. Note: The grade for this course is weighted upon successful completion of the course.

COMPUTER ANIMATION (TE9169) 0.5 credit

In this project-based course, students will build interactive content that can be shared over the Internet. The course will cover creating graphics, animation, and motion graphics. Students will learn about the aesthetics of design, motion, and sound. By constructing user interactive projects, students will be challenged to think in a nonlinear way. Students will learn to use a combination of logical reasoning (basic programming), critical thinking and artistic creativity. This course is open to all grades and would not require any prerequisites. It targets students interested in digital media– students, who are inclined towards a combination of art and technology.

CREATING APPS FOR PHONE, PADS AND OTHER DEVICES (TE9029) 1.0 credit

This is a semester-long introduction to smartphone application development. Students will create apps that function on Android and iPhone smartphones. The course will cover design best practices and utilize a variety of tools / programming languages to create apps. While computer programing is used in the class, no previous programming knowledge is required.

BROADCAST JOURNALISM (EN9069) 1.0 credit

Students taking Broadcast Journalism will learn to write copy for and report both news and feature stories. This course exposes students to the process of live television production.  Students will learn to operate a studio camera and use angles, shot length, movement and other techniques to create an interesting news story. Students will learn the techniques of producing, directing, editing, and anchoring in the studio providing valuable experience in the television industry.   Final Cut Express will be used in this course. Note: This course is in conjunction with the English department offering and can be taken multiple times for advanced study of the subject.

WEB PAGE DESIGN  (TE9149) 0.5 credit

Students will learn the basics of creating web pages using the HTML 5 programming language. The evaluation of existing websites will also be stressed to better understand the components of an outstanding web site. This course may be taken multiple times for advanced study of the subject.

 

FINE and PRACTICAL ARTS DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

WOODCRAFT 1 (IA9029) 1.0 credit

This course develops a student’s use of simple tools and equipment for the construction of woodcraft projects. There will be an emphasis on the ability to use simple tools, design layout and project completion. This is an introduction to woodworking focusing on the safe and proper use of woodworking tools, power machines, and materials.

WOODCRAFT 2 (IA9039) 1.0 credit

Woodcraft 2 will include a review of skills taught in Woodcraft 1 with further instruction on design and more advanced machine operations. The emphasis will be on planning and construction of fine furniture and cabinetry. Woodcraft 2 will provide the opportunity for the student to further develop and refine his/her skills. There will be ample time for the student to explore advanced methods and procedures utilized in the construction of fine furniture.

STAGE CRAFT (IA9069) Offered at Liberty High School 1.0 credit

This class will include sections on set construction, lighting design and installation, sound systems including using microphones, monitor speakers and mixers. Stage craft will have many hands-on activities setting up for the many programs and events.

HOME DESIGN AND MODEL BUILDING (IA9059)Offered at Liberty High School  0.5 credit

Students will learn basic home construction techniques and house framing skills through the use of hands-on home model building work.  Emphasis will be placed on determining the correct lumber and types for construction, as well as the other building materials that go into every house-building project.  All work will be done using simple woodworking hand and craft tools.

 

HEALTH and PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY (HF9089)0.5 credit

This course explores specific health-related issues relevant to students through the science of epidemiology, the study of how and why diseases are distributed in a given population. This course will prepare students to make personal and collective evidence-based decisions pertaining to public health.

INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY (HF9079) 0.5 credit

This course is designed for those students who are interested in pursuing a career in the field of kinesiology.  The philosophy, history and scientific foundations of kinesiology, exercise science, health/wellness, fitness and sport will be covered.  Students will have the opportunity to explore professional career opportunities in teaching, coaching, athletic training, sport management, fitness leadership, sport media and health/wellness. The challenges, future of kinesiology, sport and health/wellness are also addressed.

SPORTS NUTRITION (HF9069) 0.5 credit

Sports Nutrition is a class that enables students to examine the relationship between physical activity, proper nutrition, sports performance and overall wellness. Students will learn what foods are needed for healthy lifestyles and peak performance. This course strengthens health promotion and disease prevention through increased knowledge of nutrition and physical activity. This course will also take an in-depth look at the role of dietary supplements in high school athletics. Sports Nutrition is a great class for students interested in pursuing a career in the fitness field or are currently involved in an athletic program.

LIFEGUARD TRAINING AND ADVENTURE (HF9139)0.5 credit

Students will complete the American Red Cross Lifeguard course. Swimming ability equal to American Red Cross Lifeguard pre-course skills checklist. Students must be 15 years of age .A swimming ability equal to level 4 of the Red Cross swim program is required, which includes swimming for distances with rhythmic breathing, treading water, deep water submersion.

PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINING (HF9149)0.5 credit

A hybrid course designed specifically for students who have an interest in learning about becoming a personal fitness trainer. Students will learn about anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, fitness testing and health assessment, nutrition, exercise prescription, equipment usage, and legal/safety issues. Interested seniors will be provided with the option of sitting for a National Personal Fitness Trainer Certification exam* upon successful completion of the course. Note: Students must be 18 years of age to take the National Personal Fitness Trainer Certification exam.

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT OFFERINGS

PUBLIC SPEAKING (EN9049) 0.5 credit

Public Speaking helps students prepare for various speaking situations. Students are guided toward the creative development of speaking forms: process, persuasive, and informational. Additional skills emphasized include planning, preparing, and presenting a speech, the incorporation of technology, and critical evaluation.

EFFECTIVE PRESENTATION SKILLS FOR 21ST CENTURY CAREERS (EN9149) 0.5 credit

This course will provide students with the necessary skills and supports for career-based public speaking and presentations, including methods of gathering and presenting information for a variety of audiences. Special emphasis will be placed on providing support for students conducting field studies and capstone projects in all subject areas and career pathways.

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION & PUBLIC RELATIONS (EN9109) 0.5 credit

Introduction to Communication and Public Relations explores the fundamentals of various applications of persuasive and public relations techniques to forms of written and oral communications. Some forms covered will be press releases, media kits, sales and promotional pieces, newsletters and related formats. Students will apply problem-solving skills and public relations principles to real-world projects and assignments. In addition, students will learn how to promote a product, brand, or event through effective communication campaigns.

PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIONS (EN9119) 0.5 credit

In this course, students will explore the communications/media field by examining the various roles and responsibilities of the media as well as career options. Students will study key topics such as videography, animation/graphics, editing, reporting and writing, storyboarding, verbal communication, social media, and digital strategies.